Pictured in the front row are Princeton Care Center residents Florence Bogner, Robert Lipsky, Stella Sawicka and Carol Rotilio. In the back row are Razak Obajinmi (staff); owner and administrator Ezra Bogner and Martha Bah (staff). (Photo by Carolyn Steber.)
Pictured in the front row are Princeton Care Center residents Florence Bogner, Robert Lipsky, Stella Sawicka and Carol Rotilio. In the back row are Razak Obajinmi (staff); owner and administrator Ezra Bogner and Martha Bah (staff). (Photo by Carolyn Steber.)

When walking into the Princeton Care Center, it’s hard not to feel part of the activity.

There is a welcoming receptionist, staff bustling around and residents out of their rooms and socializing. It feels like walking into someone’s busy home.

That feeling is one of the things that sets the care facility apart from others.

Princeton Care Center has been family owned and operated since 1985. It is a place for people to live, receive treatment and be part of a community. The facility offers rehabilitation services, hospice, subacute care, long-term care and a cardiac recovery program.

But most of all, the staff make it a point to help the residents feel at home.

“[The residents] get very close with the staff, as well as with the other residents. We have all the makings of any other type of community living,” said Pat Chiorello, the vice president of operations.

Bogner, administrator and owner of the facility, said they achieve this sense of family through the longevity of employees. Everyone becomes close, whether they are a nurse, dietary aid or housekeeper.

“If you have the same caregiver it helps in what can sometimes be a difficult situation,” Chiorello said.

Another plus is that the center isn’t owned by a corporation, Bogner said. That makes it easier for residents to have their needs met quickly and efficiently.

“I’m here five or six days a week. My father’s here a number of days a week. We’re owned and operated by ourselves,” Bogner said. “It’s our place and it has been for a long time. There’s that extra level of attention being paid to things.”

There are about 98 residents currently living in the care center. They participate in planned activities such as flower arranging, cooking classes, singalongs, arts and crafts, current events and even participated in last month’s Olympic games.

The residents held relay races and passed an Olympic torch, Bogner said.

Residents are encouraged to participate in activities as well as enjoy their meals in one of the dining rooms.

“Dining is not just the food, it’s the social aspect of it,” Bogner said.

Daily life at Princeton Care Center is designed to keep residents comfortable. This is even apparent in the way rooms are set up.

The center offers private and semi-private rooms. Unlike other care facilities, Princeton Care Center has set up the double rooms for maximum privacy. The rooms are L-shaped, and beds aren’t side by side but instead toe to toe.

One other uncommon aspect of the center is the unit completely devoted to Indian residents, which opened in August 2010.

According to Chiorello, there are cultural activities, religious services and specific dietary considerations made for the growing Indian population in the area.

“We realize we are at a hub of different Indian communities. When people are looking for long term or short term care they wanted to know if we offered the food or the religious services. We realized we had a great opportunity,” Bogner said.

There are 14 beds in the unit and staff hired to help with the religious services.

Residents not living in the Indian section are free to take part in Indian activities and vice versa.

Princeton Care Center is located at 728 Bunn Drive in Princeton. Visitors are welcome to stop by and tour the facility at any time. Phone: (609) 924-9000. On the Web: princetoncarecenter.net.